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"He was, admittedly, a hard person to get along with sometimes, and definitely rubbed people the wrong way. But he was always awesome with me—he was a friend of mine—and he was just a great talent, too. John Lennon wasn't always a nice guy, that's for sure, and Kurt Cobain wasn't always a nice guy. Not saying that he's the same, but I'm just saying sometimes people put too much weight on whether or not someone's a good person and forget about the fact that they're just making music."

Topic: Jay Reatard
Speaker: Pink Eyes
Source

"Looking back on the last decade, it's hard to name another 10-year record, a record that 10 years from now I'm going to be able to look back upon and say, 'That's still just as good as when I heard it the first time.' Everything that he's done is amazing, but I think 'Blood Visions' is his magnum opus"

Topic: Jay Reatard
Speaker: Pink Eyes
Source

"Jay was what few people have the capacity to be. He created an undeniably classic album that contained so much pain transferred to tape in such an explosive way that it made you feel different after hearing it. He was transgressive and honest. His flaws were something he focused on and overdubbed and distorted until they made you forget who he really was—a person with feelings and a good heart. He loved music and worked hard from a young age to pursue it. He was a self-made and unmade man. I am truly sickened to see him go."

Topic: Jay Reatard
Speaker: Bradford Cox
Source

"I’m far from a poet, I never really dug Bob Dylan so I don’t approach writing lyrics from that style. Sometimes it’s as simple, in pop music, as finding something that rhymes. I’m aware that certain words sound more musical and what not. I started to use things that sound rhythmic and melodic at the same time. That’s about all I think about when I sing songs, 'How do these words sound?' more than 'What do they mean?'"

Topic: Bob Dylan
Speaker: Jay Reatard
Source

"Eric called up a few people and asked them if they’d play with me. Greg (Cartwright) from The Oblivians was the only person who agreed, he played drums, so it was just a two piece. It was like that for a year at least. It was kind of weird going from ripping somebody off to actually playing with them."

Topic: Oblivians
Speaker: Jay Reatard
Source

"In 1995 Rocket From the Crypt had The Oblivians open for them in Memphis at this big shitty rock venue. I thought The Oblivians were like the worst band I’d ever seen, but there was something about it I was drawn to. I went to the record store and described the band to the person at the counter. I was like, ‘It’s this drunken sloppy band with no bass.' She was like, ‘Oh, that’s The Oblivians,’ and I bought their records. From there I just started hanging out with Eric (Oblivian) and he turned me on to other stuff I would have never found out about otherwise."

Topic: Oblivians
Speaker: Jay Reatard
Source

"Gonna turn into Brian Wilson, and I’m gonna have to get a fucking sandbox built in my bedroom or something. I’m the most inspired when something completely destroys me to the point where I’m bedridden, depressed and feeling completely self-loathing and hating myself. The moment when I can finally get enough energy to get up, that’s when I find that songs really start coming. And after I finish writing the songs, that’s such a feeling of release, that I’ve accomplished something, that I get happy and want to leave."

Topic: Brian Wilson
Speaker: Jay Reatard
Source

"That youthful idea that everything’s going to be alright, that I’m going to be someone’s Prince Charming and ride off into the sunset. It’s just apparent to me how things aren’t that easy; they don’t work that way. I think I’m disillusioned a bit, with the world. Hopefully I don’t follow in their footsteps and go into that odd, 1981 'I did too much coke, can’t make a decent song to save my life' phase, but I’ve still got a decent amount of time to figure that one out too [laughs]."

Topic: The Beach Boys
Speaker: Jay Reatard
Source

"Take the Beach Boys; the majority of people think their cheery songs about surfing and the sun are their best stuff. But I think once they got a little older and they realized that the '60s were over, and that the utopia isn’t going to happen, and the reality of 1970-1971 set in, that’s when that band starting making their best music."

Topic: The Beach Boys
Speaker: Jay Reatard
Source

"When I listen to certain music, I identify those melodies as very distinctly British melodies. I feel like the melodies and the chords lend themselves to being sung that way. I read an interview with Bob Pollard where he was talking about people giving him a hard time for singing with a fake British accent, and he said, 'Well, that’s because I grew up listening to the fucking Who.' The chord progressions we’re playing are stripped straight from those songs, and so are the melodies. So it’s hard to sing like I’m from Memphis, Tennessee when I’m singing a melody from a British song. Somebody once told me I sound less like a guy from the South trying to sound British and more like a British guy trying to sound like a hillbilly. I’ll go for the latter [laughs]."

Topic: Guided by Voices
Speaker: Jay Reatard
Source

"I’m a big fan of Devo, and their whole thing about de-evolution. Things can only evolve so far before they have to devolve. Everything rots."

Topic: Devo
Speaker: Jay Reatard
Source

"I had never listened to the Adverts. I 
would always see them in people’s punk collection, and think, “Okay, this looks like bad UK punk.” It’s funny; I don’t even tend to like much punk from the UK at all. 
And people go, “Oh! It sounds like ’70s UK punk, but the good stuff.” And I’m like, “I don’t even know much good stuff.” I’ve never liked it. I’ve tended to always like domestic rock more than a foreign interpretation on it, so it’s kind of weird. Wire is pretty much the only UK band I’ve listened to consistently. "

Topic: The Adverts
Speaker: Jay Reatard
Source

"I don't see at any point the live show ever being a mirror image of what the records sound like. That's boring, man. I've had people complain to me at shows, like, 'That didn't sound anything like your record.' Well, then go see the fucking Foo Fighters. Go see Metallica. It has to be interesting for the band as much as the audience, so we switch arrangements around, or switch the lyrics. If you're trying to emulate your record, it's like you're selling Xerox copies of a painting."

Topic: Foo Fighters
Speaker: Jay Reatard
Source

"During the writing process, I tend not to listen to too much music. I obviously wear a lot of influences on my sleeve, but if I was listening to too many records, I would turn into too much of a monkey. Songs just seem to manifest themselves in some other way in your music, and you get really bummed when later you think you have a rad song and you figure out, 'Well, that's just a Wire riff.'"

Topic: Wire
Speaker: Jay Reatard
Source

"I've been listening to a lot of old 50s songs recently—recordings of old Bo Diddley, Arthur Crudup, early James Brown—and wondering why those records are so exciting. I suddenly realized that one of the reasons is because the musicians knew they were in a position where they couldn't retract what they did. Contemporary musicians don't have that constraint anymore. Like I said in this thing [the essay], you can erase anything."

Topic: Bo Diddley
Speaker: Brian Eno
Source

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